Call for Programme Proposals

INSTRUCTIONS – PROGRAMME PROPOSALS               

 DEADLINE 2 NOVEMBER 2015

DEFINITIONS OF MEETING SESSIONS

  1. Symposia with a 90-minute format:
    Consisting of a series of in-depth scientific and state-of-the-art lectures in important areas of sports injury and illness prevention research. Typically, these will cover different aspects of injury or illness prevention (epidemiology, injury mechanisms, risk factors, pathophysiology, prevention methods) as they relate to a particular injury type (e.g. hamstring injuries, ACL injuries), health problem (e.g. asthma, sudden cardiac death, eating disorders) or sport (e.g. rugby, volleyball), but other approaches are also welcome. 90-minute symposia should include 4 – 6 speakers with time allotted for a general introduction and overview, as well as a minimum of 15 minutes for overall discussion at the end. The maximum time allotted to each lecture is 15 minutes, but the same speaker may give up to two lectures in the same symposium.
  1. Symposia with a 60-minute format:
    Same as 90-minute symposia, except 60-minute symposia include 3 – 4 speakers, as well as at least 10 minutes for overall discussion at the end. The maximum time allotted to each lecture is 12 minutes.
  1. Unopposed keynote lectures (45-60 minutes):
    These should feature recognised experts in the area of sports injury/illness prevention delivering an in-depth, scientific and state-of-the-art lecture in an area of interest to the general audience (physicians, physical therapists, athletic trainers, coaches and officials).
  1. Head-to-head debates (45-60 minutes)
    Head-to-head debates are suitable to address controversial issues, such as screening for ACL injury risk, ECG screening to detect underlying heart conditions, etc. These should feature two speakers arguing the pro et con, each with an initial 10-15 min of speaking time, taking turns, and then 3-5 min each for rebuttals. A “neutral” chair should also be nominated. Finally, there should be a discussion period to engage the audience (min. 10 min for a 45 min session, 15 min for a 60 min session).
  1. Workshops (40-50 minutes):
    Workshops are interactive discussions or demonstrations on a topic or issue in sports injury/illness prevention. These could be related to practical injury prevention programmes (e.g. exercise programmes), skills (e.g. taping, bracing), or methodological issues of particular relevance to researchers in the area. Workshops are informal, with 1 – 2 speakers, intending to give a maximum of 25 attendees a chance to “meet the expert”.

PROPOSAL FORMAT
Your proposal should follow the format below, but must – in addition – also include a description of the value and significance of the topic and speaker(s) to enable the scientific committee to judge the merit of the proposal. Note: This description should be a maximum of one page – do NOT send CVs or publication lists for speakers, except for proposals for unopposed keynote lectures.

  1. Title of symposium, lecture of workshop

- Please do not just state the general topic to be covered, but give a specific title which describes lecture content as precisely as possible. “Catchy” titles are most welcome, especially for keynote lectures.

  1. Programme including name of speakers

- Specific titles for each lecture and name of speaker for each topic. Again, specific titles are recommended. Specify the duration of each lecture in minutes. For symposia, the name of the chair should also be given.

  1. List of speakers

- To include name, academic degree, title, e-mail address, mailing address. This information should be formatted exactly as shown in the example below. Incomplete submissions will not be considered by the scientific committee.

SAMPLE PROPOSAL (90-min symposium example – Please note that proposals must be submitted using this exact format!)

Title: Preventing ankle injuries
Chair: Jon Karlsson (Sweden)
Programme: 

Jon Karlsson: What is the extent of the problem? (5 minutes)

Jan Ekstrand (Sweden): Historical perspectives on ankle ligament injuries (5 minutes)

Lars Konradsen (Denmark): Ankle inversion injury biomechanics as a guide for ankle injury prevention (10 minutes)

Bruce Beynnon (USA): Risk factors for ankle injuries (10 minutes)

Evert Verhagen (Netherlands): Prevention – how does balance training work? Evidence and practical aspects (15 minutes)

Roald Bahr (Norway): Prevention – how does bracing and tape work? Evidence and practical aspects (15 minutes)

Willem van Mechelen (Netherlands): The effect of bracing and taping on sports performance (10 minutes)

Ekstrand: Future directions for ankle injury prevention research (5 minutes)

Karlsson, Ekstrand, Konradsen, Beynnon, Verhagen, Bahr, van Mechelen: Panel discussion – Has research changed the incidence of ankle injuries? (15 minutes)

Speakers:

Jon Karlsson MD PhD Professor
jon.karlsson@congress2008.no
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery
PO Box 2008
Sportstown, 2008 Sweden

Jan Ekstrand MD PhD Professor
Jan.Ekstrand@congress2008.no
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery
PO Box 2008
Sportstown, 2008 Sweden

Lars Konradsen MD PhD Professor
Lars.Konradsen@congress2008.no
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery
PO Box 2008
Sportstown, 2008 Denmark

Bruce Beynnon PhD Professor
Bruce.Beynnon@congress2008.no
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery
PO Box 2008
Sportstown, VT 2008, USA

Evert Verhagen PhD Professor
evert.verhagen@congress2008.no
Department of Sports Medicine
PO Box 2008
Sportstown, 2008 Netherlands

Roald Bahr MD PhD Professor
roald.bahr@congress2008.no
Department of Sports Medicine
PO Box 2008
Sportstown, 2008 Norway

Willem van Mechelen MD PhD Professor
willem.v.mechelen@congress2008.no
Department of Sports Medicine
PO Box 2008
Sportstown, 2008 Netherlands